The Atlanta Manhattan Smackdown

You live in Atlanta? You like a Manhattan? Be sure to check out this roundup of Manhattan cocktails around town that I wrote for Creative Loafing:

The Manhattan in its most common form is one of the most straightforward classic cocktails — two parts whiskey, one part sweet vermouth, a dash or two of bitters. But that outward simplicity is deceiving. Will it be bourbon or rye, and which bourbon or rye? Then, which vermouth pairs most harmoniously with that whiskey? What will that magic ratio of whiskey to vermouth be? Which little bottle of bitters provides the appropriate accents? Will it all be vigorously shaken or patiently stirred? Garnished with a toxic red “maraschino” cherry (the horrors!) or something more artisanal in nature like the real deal from Italy’s Luxardo brand? The minute but meaningful variations are infinite.

Continue reading at Creative Loafing Atlanta

Related: Maraschino Cherry Comparison, featuring H&F and Luxardo

About Thirsty South

Dedicated to all things drinking well in the South.
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3 Responses to The Atlanta Manhattan Smackdown

  1. Ian Lauer says:

    Great article, Brad. I haven’t sampled many around town, since the Manhattan’s a drink I like making at home. A good way to gauge the approach of a particular bartender or bar, though.

    I mainly use Cocchi Vermouth di Torino and Angostura Bitters…the whiskey varies, but my favorites are Russell’s Reserve Rye, High West Bourye, and Black Maple Hill Red Label. Always stirred, of course, and always 2:1 whiskey:vermouth.

    You like the H&F cherries better than Luxardo, eh? I’ll have to pick up a jar : )

    PS: The Employees Only “Manhattan Cocktail” is a great variation, and very old-school-tasting…1.5 oz Rittenhouse, 1.75 oz Dolin Rouge, 0.5 oz Grand Marnier, 3 dashes Angostura. Stirred, orange twist.

  2. Spooner says:

    Enjoyed the article! And have to agree with you, H&F makes a fantastic manhattan. I’ve tried making ones with Willet rye at home, but I can never get it to work. Oh well, I’ll leave it up to the experts!

Comments welcome, y'all!